Portfolio

Blog

Kevin Svensen honored with 2016 AIA Richmond award

Kevin Svensen, RA, earned the Richard L. Ford Jr. Award. This is considered the Chapter’s highest award presented to a young architect, associate member, or intern. It is given in honor of one of the Chapter’s leading and skillful mentors, Richard L. Ford, Jr. FAIA. Kevin has been given the award by the Chapter Board, based on nominations by the Honors Committee, as a person who has demonstrated vision, passion, and excellence to the design community. Source: G&HA team members honored with 2016 AIA Richmond awards | Glavé & Holmes Architecture | News and Press

The Linguistics of Place Names | JSTOR Daily

Why is this important, to have a place name with a sense of history and meaning? Thomas F. Thornton believes “as linguistic artifacts […], place names tell us something not only about the structure and content of the physical environment itself but also […] toponyms, both by themselves and in the context of narratives, songs, and everyday speech, provide valuable insights into the ways humans experience the world.” Even when we don’t know the language, we can derive certain ideas from the landscape we see around us and the old place names still in use. Consider tri-state names of native…

Design for the One Percent | Jacobin

Not so long ago, the world’s leading architects debated how architecture could be used to transform society by providing housing for workers, improving public health, and fostering social solidarity. Today, global architecture is peopled with “starchitects” like Hadid who specialize in mega projects for the global elite. Some of the starchitects’ projects are beautiful, to be sure. But they also often waste public money, facilitate corrupt and exploitative practices, and strengthen a planning model that excludes the populace from decision-making. Many architectural creations are poorly constructed, requiring exorbitant maintenance costs (invariably following massive budget overruns) and lacking consideration for the…

Humanism and the Urban World: Leon Battista Alberti and the Renaissance City, Caspar Pearson

“Everyone relies on the city,” wrote Leon Battista Alberti, “and all the public services that it contains.” This statement, delivered in such a matter-of-fact manner, indicates the exceptional importance of cities in the society in which Alberti lived. His world was an urban one. He was born in Genoa, grew up in Venice, was educated in Padua and Bologna, and subsequently lived and worked in Rome, Florence, Mantua, Rimini, and Ferrara. Fifteenth-century Italy, divided into a patchwork of city-states, boasted what was arguably the most developed urban society in Europe at the time. Moreover, Italy offered a wide variety of…

If a City Were Perfect, What Would It Look Like? – The New York Times

When Baldassare Castiglione described Urbino in 1506 as a “city in the form of a palace” he would probably have expected his more cultivated readers to catch the allusion to Leon Battista Alberti’s assertion in his “De re aedificatoria” (On the Art of Building) that “the city is like a great house, and the house in its turn a small city.” During his reign between 1444 and 1482, Federico da Montefeltro’s marvelous edifice played host to as much intellectual and artistic activity as entire cities many times Urbino’s size. And Alberti, along with Luciano Laurana, Piero della Francesca and Francesco…

Campaign — We Back Beauty

We Back Beauty is a campaign to restore the democratic discernment and realisation of beauty to the heart of public policy and local planning in the UK. Over the next 12 months, ResPublica’s Backing Beauty Commission will look to raise the profile of the concept of beauty in planning and public policy. Building on ResPublica’s July 2015 report A Community Right to Beauty, the campaign will call for higher priority to be given to the concept of beauty, and for the devolution of powers to local authorities and communities to allow them to improve their locales in line with local…

Christopher Newport Hall wins National Palladio Award | Glavé & Holmes Architecture | News and Press

Glavé & Holmes Architecture has been named a 2016 Palladio Award winner for the design of the new Christopher Newport Hall at Christopher Newport University. The Palladio Awards are a national program that honors outstanding achievement in traditional design. Recognized for their work in the New Design & Construction category (more than 30,000 square feet), Glavé & Holmes was one of only 12 architectural firms in the country honored by the 2016 Palladio Awards Program. Source: Christopher Newport Hall wins National Palladio Award | Glavé & Holmes Architecture | News and Press

In ‘The Lonely City,’ Olivia Laing Turns Her Experience of Isolation Into an Investigation of Visual Art – CityLab

Oftentimes, loneliness is assigned to people who enter a new place alone, but remaining in a place that’s constantly changing can bring about loneliness of a different variety. How so?Diverse cities are such a balm for the lonely. Homogenous places can be extremely isolating, particularly if you feel like you don’t belong. The way that gentrification pushes cities towards homogeneity—driving out the poor, disabled and homeless, making cities ever whiter and shinier and cleaner, turning them into refuges for the rich—is a very worrying trend. Cosmopolitanism is a great gift, and something we must strive to preserve.You write that “fear…

Sprawl is not the problem — Strong Towns

We identify the problem as the Suburban Experiment, which we contrast with the Traditional Development Pattern. Both of these we have defined: Suburban Experiment:The approach to growth and development that has become dominant in North America during the 20th Century. There are two distinguishing characteristics of this approach that differentiate it from the Traditional Development Pattern. They are: (1) New growth happens at a large scale and (2) Construction is done to a finished state; there is no further growth anticipated after the initial construction. Traditional Development Pattern: The approach to growth and development that humans used for thousands of years across…

Jane Jacobs Was Put to the Test in 6 Italian Cities – Next City

In her 1961 book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, urban sociologist Jane Jacobs proposed four conditions essential to vibrant city life, ideas which were both influential and controversial. Recently, researcher Marco De Nadai and his team at the University of Trento designed a way to test those conditions by mining databases and cell phone records in six Italian cities.RELATED STORIES“Urban Metabolism” Could Beat “Sustainability” in a Buzzword ContestMexico City’s Secret Planning Weapon? Building BridgesNew Big Data Tool to Show How and Why We Move Around CitiesWho Is Designing the 21st-Century City?Spoiler alert: They found her ideas to…