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Christopher Newport Hall wins National Palladio Award | Glavé & Holmes Architecture | News and Press

Glavé & Holmes Architecture has been named a 2016 Palladio Award winner for the design of the new Christopher Newport Hall at Christopher Newport University. The Palladio Awards are a national program that honors outstanding achievement in traditional design. Recognized for their work in the New Design & Construction category (more than 30,000 square feet), Glavé & Holmes was one of only 12 architectural firms in the country honored by the 2016 Palladio Awards Program. Source: Christopher Newport Hall wins National Palladio Award | Glavé & Holmes Architecture | News and Press

In ‘The Lonely City,’ Olivia Laing Turns Her Experience of Isolation Into an Investigation of Visual Art – CityLab

Oftentimes, loneliness is assigned to people who enter a new place alone, but remaining in a place that’s constantly changing can bring about loneliness of a different variety. How so?Diverse cities are such a balm for the lonely. Homogenous places can be extremely isolating, particularly if you feel like you don’t belong. The way that gentrification pushes cities towards homogeneity—driving out the poor, disabled and homeless, making cities ever whiter and shinier and cleaner, turning them into refuges for the rich—is a very worrying trend. Cosmopolitanism is a great gift, and something we must strive to preserve.You write that “fear…

Sprawl is not the problem — Strong Towns

We identify the problem as the Suburban Experiment, which we contrast with the Traditional Development Pattern. Both of these we have defined: Suburban Experiment:The approach to growth and development that has become dominant in North America during the 20th Century. There are two distinguishing characteristics of this approach that differentiate it from the Traditional Development Pattern. They are: (1) New growth happens at a large scale and (2) Construction is done to a finished state; there is no further growth anticipated after the initial construction. Traditional Development Pattern: The approach to growth and development that humans used for thousands of years across…

Jane Jacobs Was Put to the Test in 6 Italian Cities – Next City

In her 1961 book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, urban sociologist Jane Jacobs proposed four conditions essential to vibrant city life, ideas which were both influential and controversial. Recently, researcher Marco De Nadai and his team at the University of Trento designed a way to test those conditions by mining databases and cell phone records in six Italian cities.RELATED STORIES“Urban Metabolism” Could Beat “Sustainability” in a Buzzword ContestMexico City’s Secret Planning Weapon? Building BridgesNew Big Data Tool to Show How and Why We Move Around CitiesWho Is Designing the 21st-Century City?Spoiler alert: They found her ideas to…

Learning about Life from Wendell Berry | The Washington Institute

I ask another question: what are the conditions for human flourishing? That is another way into these weeks together, listening and learning as we are to this Kentucky farmer and father, husband to his wife and husbander of his land, the one that serious critics call “the most serious essayist in America today.” To press the point, this week I had them read Berry’s essay, “Two Economies,” in which he makes the argument that there are always two economies at work. Lesser economies and a Greater Economy, the former being the economy of a small town or a large city,…

Data Mining Reveals the Four Urban Conditions That Create Vibrant City Life

While Jacobs’s arguments are persuasive, her critics say there is little evidence to show that these factors are linked with vibrant city life. That changed last year when urban scientists in Seoul, South Korea, published the result of a 10-year study of pedestrian activity in the city at unprecedented resolution. This work successfully tested Jacobs’s ideas for the first time. However, the data was gathered largely through pedestrian surveys, a process that is time-consuming, costly, and generally impractical for use in most modern cities. De Nadai and co have come up with a much cheaper and quicker alternative using a…

Neoliberalism has hijacked our vocabulary | Doreen Massey | Opinion | The Guardian

At a recent art exhibition I engaged in an interesting conversation with one of the young people employed by the gallery. As she turned to walk off I saw she had on the back of her T-shirt “customer liaison”. I felt flat. Our whole conversation seemed somehow reduced, my experience of it belittled into one of commercial transaction. My relation to the gallery and to this engaging person had become one of instrumental market exchange. The message underlying this use of the term customer for so many different kinds of human activity is that in all almost all our daily…

The New Old Masters | City Journal

“Our culture,” he continued, “has inherited the idea that if artists are not avant-garde they cannot have a significant role. That’s a fallacy we’ve inherited from some Parisian nut-job radicals. The rejection of beauty is so accepted. It’s high time that we as a culture attend to our beauty position.” To much of the New York art world, Collins’s “beauty position,” which he applies to his own paintings of nudes, still lifes, and landscapes, might look embarrassingly retrograde. He enjoys the support of a small minority of critics and writers—most of whom, like him, regard modern art with skepticism. Novelist…

Is your neighborhood making you depressed? Urban planning can influence your health – Rachel Belle | MyNorthwest.com

Ellard breaks down landscape types by complexity. A low-complexity landscape might be a long, stark, unbroken facade in front of a big, corporate building, like a bank. High complexity offers lots of architectural variety, quirky mom-and-pop shops, and lots of greenery.”What we’re finding is the low-complexity environments tend to produce boredom,” Ellard says. “People really don’t like them, people tend to behave differently in front of them. They tend to speed up when they’re walking through one of these areas. In contrast, when you look at how people behave in front of a high-complexity facade, then people are happy, they’re…

How a Black Lives Matter Activist Wants to Change City Planning – Curbed

With his recent, last-minute entry into the Baltimore mayoral race, 30-year-old Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson immediately changes the contours and scope of the conversation, bringing a unique perspective and racial issues to the forefront. And while the city has had its share of traumatic recent event, such as the Freddie Grey case, Mckesson’s movement experience doesn’t mean he’s merely a one-issue candidate. He wants to improve the city that made him the man he is. Based on the policy ideas he’s introduced over the last few weeks, it’s perhaps best to consider his platform as a vision for the city,…