Beautiful urban architecture boosts health as much as green spaces – Telegraph

A brisk walk in the countryside or a stroll along the beach is a well-known mood booster and health experts have long recommended getting out of the city improve physical and mental wellbeing. But a new study suggests that beautiful urban architecture, the sweep of docklands, or a gritty suburban river bank can have just as much impact on health and happiness levels. Researchers at the University of Warwick say it is ‘scenery’ not just ‘greenery’ which is important when determining what makes a positive environment. “The beauty of our everyday environment might have more practical importance than was previously…

Classical architecture makes us happy. So why not build more of it? 

The key to a happy life, it’s been discovered, is living near to Georgian architecture and a Waitrose. Bath, York, Chichester, Stamford, Skipton, Harrogate, Oxford and Cambridge are among the towns listed in the Sunday Times 20 nicest places to live in Britain survey.Almost all these areas have one thing in common: they all feature a great deal of Georgian housing. And they’re all mostly unaffordable. There is a fair amount of research suggesting that traditional architecture, such as Georgian and Victorian terraces and mansion blocks, contributes to our wellbeing. Beauty makes people happy.This can be measured through house prices,…

John Hayes (Minister of State for Transport): The Journey to Beauty (2016)

The rarity with which the case for beauty is articulated is explained partly by timidity, and partly by unwillingness to challenge modernist determinism; by the surrender of many decent people to the Whiggish notion that the future is bound to be better than now and, in any case, there isn’t much we can do about altering it. The aesthetics of our built environment – including our transport architecture – has suffered from what Sir Roger Scruton has called the Cult of Ugliness. Yet there are signs that we’re on the cusp of a popular revolt against this soulless cult, and…

An Alternate Site for London Symphony’s New Hall,and A Long Due Act of Redemption | Future Symphony Institute

Léon Krier: London Music Forum, 2016.AN ALTERNATE SITE FOR LONDON SYMPHONY’S NEW HALL,AND A LONG DUE ACT OF REDEMPTION Source: An Alternate Site for London Symphony’s New Hall,and A Long Due Act of Redemption | Future Symphony Institute

An Interactive Map of Shakespeare’s London – CityLab

Jenstad is an English professor at the University of Victoria who has been exploring the Civitas Londinum base map since the late 1990s. The bird’s-eye view of London (also known as the “Agas” map) was first printed on woodblocks in 1561—right around the time of Shakespeare’s birth—then modified a century later. The intricate “Agas” map shows details such as monuments, institutions, businesses, marketplaces, and urban planning fixtures. Jenstad’s interactive version pulls information from databases with names of locations, people, organizations in the city at the time, as well as reference material about the early modern period in London. These data…