Classical architecture makes us happy. So why not build more of it? 

The key to a happy life, it’s been discovered, is living near to Georgian architecture and a Waitrose. Bath, York, Chichester, Stamford, Skipton, Harrogate, Oxford and Cambridge are among the towns listed in the Sunday Times 20 nicest places to live in Britain survey.Almost all these areas have one thing in common: they all feature a great deal of Georgian housing. And they’re all mostly unaffordable. There is a fair amount of research suggesting that traditional architecture, such as Georgian and Victorian terraces and mansion blocks, contributes to our wellbeing. Beauty makes people happy.This can be measured through house prices,…

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD, DISTRICT, AND CORRIDOR – ACADEMIC AWARD

RESPONSE TO CHARTER PRINCIPLES      The building stock is retained for present uses or for adaptive re-uses (Charter Principles 4, 5, 27).  New buildings are shaped with shallow floor plates for passive heating, cooling, and ventilating; these are also modeled to accommodate flexibly a variety of uses and do so over time: groceries, doctors offices, retail (CP 12, 26).  The blocks are small with a fine-grain to maximize the choices for pedestrians (CP 12).      Second, the proposed intervention reverses the urban morphology with the canal as the backside to the canal as the neighborhood’s public space as…

Andrés Duany:  Why We Code | Studio Sky

Within the last half-century, some 30 million buildings have degraded cities and reduced landscapes. Must we tolerate this comprehensive disaster in exchange for the (perhaps) three thousand great buildings that great architects have produced? Such a win-loss ratio is as unacceptable in architecture as it would be in any other field. We are compelled to intervene and have found that codes are the most effective instruments of reform.We must code because the default setting in contemporary design is mediocrity and worse. Those who object to codes imagine that they constrain architectural masterpieces (their own, usually). But great buildings are few…

Faculty and Alumnus Honored with ICAA Acanthus Awards // News // School of Architecture // University of Notre Dame

The Acanthus Awards … honor exemplary student work in classical or traditional design from current students and recent graduates.  School of Architecture alumnus Christopher C. Miller, M. Arch ‘14, received recognition for his thesis project, Market Bridge for Bath:  Fitting Type to Local Character—Professor Richard Economakis was the thesis advisor.  Miller developed a plan for a mixed use neighborhood development in the area surrounding River Avon in the historic city of Bath in England. Source: Faculty and Alumnus Honored with ICAA Acanthus Awards // News // School of Architecture // University of Notre Dame See A Market for Bath:  Fitting Type to…

Congress for the New Urbanism Illinois Academic Charter Award 2016 for Gowanus: from Resilience to Sustainability

    Judson’s graduate urbanism studio has received the 2016 academic CNU-IL Charter Award!  This makes three years in a row!  Graduate student team: Justin Banda, Kay Havlicek, Tyler Hopwood, Marvin Reyes, Tyler Wade, and Andrew Witek.

Brian Mork wins Acanthus Award

Brian Mork, M.Arch.’11, Notre Dame Univ. M.A.D.U.’13, has recognized by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art- Chicago Midwest Chapter for a student project Acanthus Award.

An Alternate Site for London Symphony’s New Hall,and A Long Due Act of Redemption | Future Symphony Institute

Léon Krier: London Music Forum, 2016.AN ALTERNATE SITE FOR LONDON SYMPHONY’S NEW HALL,AND A LONG DUE ACT OF REDEMPTION Source: An Alternate Site for London Symphony’s New Hall,and A Long Due Act of Redemption | Future Symphony Institute

Where did all the small apartment buildings go? | City Observatory

… back in 1972, nearly a third of all multifamily homes were constructed in buildings with two to nine units—a typical size for lowrise apartment buildings. Significantly fewer, about a fifth, were built in very large structures with over 50 units. Small apartments peaked in 1981, with 46 percent of all new multifamily units. Since then, though, they’ve fallen off a cliff. In 2014, just seven percent of new multifamily homes were in buildings with fewer than 10 units. But nearly half—48 percent—were in buildings with 50 units or more. Source: Where did all the small apartment buildings go? |…

Here’s How American Cities Can Learn From Italian Piazzas – Next City

When the paradigm of modernist architecture crumbled, urbanists began a quest for credible alternatives that often took them to the streets and squares of old Italian cities. Deciphering the code of Italy’s thriving public life became a process of redemption from the sterilizing over-rationalization of the urban landscape that had been carried out by professionals of the previous generation. Italy is where Jan Gehl began his monumental research on public space and where many great American scholars conducted a considerable part of theirs, laying the foundation for people-centered urban design. Nevertheless, despite the seminal research of Gehl and other far-sighted…

Modern Terrace Housing (1946 Research Proposal)

In 1946 a paper examining ‘Modern Terrace Houses’ was released – complied as research by Arthur Trystan Edwards on behalf of the Chadwick Trust, its purpose was “to investigate the question of the maximum ‘density’ per acre for small houses with gardens suitable especially for the intermediate and outer zones of large towns, having regard to the amenities essential to a comprehensive town planning arrangement.” (Edwards 1946) In the paper Edwards puts forth a series of possible terrace housing types and master plans for built-up areas in large towns, rather than large blocks of tenements – as was being proposed at the…