The Willis Tower In 150 Years

[Illustrated by Andrew Banks, Judson M.Arch.’11 concentration Traditional Architecture and Urbanism] When Chicago was still celebrating the end of the Civil War, the city had a population of roughly 200,000 people. The most memorable structure from that era, the Water Tower, was still three years from construction. Today, 150 years later, the city’s population has grown by more than 1,200 percent, and the city’s tallest building, the Willis Tower, is more than 1,300 feet taller than the height of Chicago’s tallest building in 1866. This is all to say a lot can change in 150 years. Which makes our question,…

Urban Drama: Talking about Cities with Noah Toly and Milton Friesen, Part I | Comment Magazine

Comment is interested in cities. Last year we did an issue called “The Other Side of the City,” which looked at the underside of cities—the parts that don’t make it into the tourism brochures. Today we’re lucky to have two scholars and experts on urbanism, and I wanted to start with something that you would not necessarily expect: the pope. In Evangelii Gaudium, Francis has this little line about cities that I found fascinating. He says, We cannot ignore the fact that in cities human trafficking, the narcotics trade, the abuse and exploitation of minors, the abandonment of the elderly…

Toward A Vision — The Great Lakes Century

September 2014 marked an exciting milestone for the Great Basin exhibit with the opening of a bilingual French/English version in Baie-St-Paul, Québec, Canada. This opening was held as part of the annual meeting of the Ordre des Urbanistes du Québec (Québec Society of Urban Planners, OUQ). The OUQ had requested the opportunity to host the exhibit in light of its thematic resonance with the conference’s theme: Aménager le Québec des regions: au-delà des frontières (Managing a Québec of Regions: Beyond Borders). This is the exhibit’s first appearance on the Canadian side of the Great Basin and its first version in…

CNU Illinois & USGBC Illinois Green Event October 30

Please join co-hosts USGBC Illinois and CNU Illinois for an informative panel discussion exploring rooftops as an opportunity for urban agriculture. There can be many benefits to rooftop agriculture, including job creation, promotion of local food security, and a reduction on transportation impacts. In addition to being a “cool-roof” building strategy, rooftop agriculture can also contribute to achieving LEED-ND Credit 13 with “on site food production.” Our three panelists will share their perspectives on achieving successful rooftop gardens at various scales: Urban Habitat Chicago will present the roof garden created for True Nature Foods; Uncommon Ground will share their journey…

The Case for Reparations – The Atlantic

… there was no financing for people like Clyde Ross. From the 1930s through the 1960s, black people across the country were largely cut out of the legitimate home-mortgage market through means both legal and extralegal. Chicago whites employed every measure, from “restrictive covenants” to bombings, to keep their neighborhoods segregated.Their efforts were buttressed by the federal government. In 1934, Congress created the Federal Housing Administration. The FHA insured private mortgages, causing a drop in interest rates and a decline in the size of the down payment required to buy a house. But an insured mortgage was not a possibility…

Municipal Design Review in Metropolitan Chicago

Tuesday, March 18 • 5:30 p.m. Both theorists and practitioners see design standards as shaping the “look” of the community and built environment over the long run — with significant underlying ideology. Planning professionals may view design guidelines and review processes as useful tools to communicate local preferences and resolve issues. And, design standards and form-based codes have become powerful branding and placemaking tools for suburbs in the Chicago metropolitan area and nationwide. This program and discussion will serve to highlight contrasting perspectives on the benefits of design review. Drawing on observations from public architectural review commission hearings in local…

When Is It OK To Destroy Buildings? | The American Conservative

[Rod Dreher, author of Crunchy Cons and recently, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming] Modernist architecture is soulless and oppressive and ugly. Most of it one can live with, but there is a subspecies of Modernism that is to architecture what Vogon verse is to poetry: Brutalism.  The University of Cambridge is one of the most architecturally beautiful oases on the earth, but look at what the Brutalists did to parts of it.  In Washington DC, there has been a fight over whether or not the owners of a famously hideous Brutalist church had the right to destroy it; some preservationists argued…

Chicago Architect Lucien Lagrange Joins Lessard Design – Architect Magazine

Chicago-based architect Lucien Lagrange, AIA, has bounced to a new firm. Lagrange, 73, recently announced his partnership with Washington, D.C.–based design studio Lessard Design. The decision to create the Lucien Lagrange Studio of Lessard Design, a branded studio within the firm, was a mutual one. Lagrange will serve as a principal of design and head the new Chicago office. …. Lagrange began his work with Chicago-based Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill, becoming a partner after 17 years. He then branched off with his own firm in 1985, where he went on to establish his name as a successful designer with a…

CNU IL Charter Awards: Best Regional Plan

The entry is described as being developed over 18 months.  This presumably includes the graduate urban design studios for fall semesters of 2011 and 2012.  Congratulations in this CNU Illinois Award are shared by three Judson alumni who were members of these studios:  Samuel Lima JU M.Arch.’10 NDU M.A.D.U. ’12, Hannah Weber JU B.A.A.S.’10 NDU M.Arch.’12 M.A.D.U.’13 , and Brian Mork JU M.Arch.’11 NDU M.A.D.U.’13. After Burnham: The Notre Dame Plan for Chicago 2109   This was submitted by University of Notre Dame and is an ambitious transformation of Daniel Burnhams Plan of Chicago applying new urbanism, urban agriculture and sustainable development practices across…

Open House Chicago

The Chicago Architecture Foundation’s Open House Chicago is a free public event that offers behind-the-scenes access to 150 buildings across Chicago. This October, explore the hidden gems and architectural treasures of Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods—all for free. 150 cool places. 48 hours. Go. via Open House Chicago.