‘The worst building in the world awards’ | Culture | Architects Journal

A massive gulf persists between the buildings that win architecture awards and those that  the public prefers, suggests research by Create StreetsIn 1987 a young psychologist conducted an experiment into how repeated exposure to an image changed perceptions of it. A group of volunteer students were shown photographs of unfamiliar people and buildings and asked to rate them in terms of attractiveness. Some of the volunteers were architects; some were not. As the experiment progressed, a fascinating finding became clear: while everyone had similar views on which people were attractive, the architecture and non-architecture students had diametrically opposed views on…

Faculty and Alumnus Honored with ICAA Acanthus Awards // News // School of Architecture // University of Notre Dame

The Acanthus Awards … honor exemplary student work in classical or traditional design from current students and recent graduates.  School of Architecture alumnus Christopher C. Miller, M. Arch ‘14, received recognition for his thesis project, Market Bridge for Bath:  Fitting Type to Local Character—Professor Richard Economakis was the thesis advisor.  Miller developed a plan for a mixed use neighborhood development in the area surrounding River Avon in the historic city of Bath in England. Source: Faculty and Alumnus Honored with ICAA Acanthus Awards // News // School of Architecture // University of Notre Dame See A Market for Bath:  Fitting Type to…

Brian Mork wins Acanthus Award

Brian Mork, M.Arch.’11, Notre Dame Univ. M.A.D.U.’13, has recognized by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art- Chicago Midwest Chapter for a student project Acanthus Award.

Leah Ferrara and Joshua Papic published in the Classicist

Leah Ferrara’s Charleston Architecture School, produced in the spring 2015 junior/graduate vertical studio (Miller studio) and Josh Papic’s Judson Chapel, produced in the fall 2015 senior studio (Jaeger studio) has been published in the current issue of The Classicist, is an annual peer-reviewed journal published by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art.

Design for the One Percent | Jacobin

Not so long ago, the world’s leading architects debated how architecture could be used to transform society by providing housing for workers, improving public health, and fostering social solidarity. Today, global architecture is peopled with “starchitects” like Hadid who specialize in mega projects for the global elite. Some of the starchitects’ projects are beautiful, to be sure. But they also often waste public money, facilitate corrupt and exploitative practices, and strengthen a planning model that excludes the populace from decision-making. Many architectural creations are poorly constructed, requiring exorbitant maintenance costs (invariably following massive budget overruns) and lacking consideration for the…

If women built cities, what would our urban landscape look like? | Cities | The Guardian

I meet urban anthropologist Caroline Moser at her house in north London. Moser, who is 70, pioneered a gender-aware approach to planning at the Development Planning Unit at UCL, and spent much of her career doing fieldwork in Latin American slums. She is recovering from a broken foot, but has agreed to take me on a walk to show me what the gendered city looks like – and what we could expect to see more of, if planners and architects more routinely thought in these terms. “This is the antithesis of the built environment, but also the most incredible space for women…

Making the Garden by Christopher Alexander | Articles | First Things

The whole purpose of the work I have done is to show that the presence of God in a matter-­configuration is an objectively existing condition, and that there are specific paths and methods and habits of thought through which we may create buildings where the presence of God can be seen and felt. The two go hand in hand. …. That new vision can become a new source of inspiration and motivation. I call it new not because it is at root genuinely new. Of course it is not—it is ancient. But it is entirely new in our era to…

CAA News | College Art Association » Blog Archive » The Role of Contextual Studies in Art School Education in Scotland | CAA

Since 1962–63, university level art and design education in the UK has included an “academic” element, which was originally referred to as the History of Art and Design and Complementary Studies and is now better known as Critical and Contextual Studies (CCS). This element was introduced to give “degree equivalence” to what was initially a quite technically focused diploma by providing context to studio practices and developing a broader range of skills in students. Topics taught under this rubric include histories of art and design, film and media histories, critical theory, aesthetics, and, more recently, curatorial and art writing practices….

Mississippi State University School Of Architecture News – School, ICAA host Dan and Gemma Camp Workshop in Classical Design

The Institute of Classical Architecture and Art (ICAA) in conjunction with the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University recently hosted the Dan and Gemma Camp Workshop in Classical Design. The two-day workshop included a series of presentations from ICAA representatives teaching classical design, a tour of Starkville’s Cotton District by its founder and developer Dan Camp, a reception sponsored by Duncan-Williams Inc. Investment Bankers, and a drawing session. The program was made possible by an endowed gift from Dan and Gemma Camp as well as generous gifts from Briar and Michelle Jones and Duncan-Williams Inc. Investment Bankers. via School…

Andres Duany unveils his prescription for Charleston architecture – Post and Courier

“Charleston cannot be a net importer of architectural ideas,” he said. “Charleston has to model its own genetic material, which is considerable and sophisticated. And Charleston has to become an exporter of architectural ideas. The world is fascinated by Charleston. Charleston is the greatest influence of my own work.” The city and Historic Charleston Foundation spent $79,000 to bring Duany in for advice as longtime Mayor Joe Riley prepares to leave office and as the city is experiencing a prosperous new era that will only intensify interest in building here. “We ain’t seen nothing yet,” said Winslow Hastie, chief preservation…