Faculty and Alumnus Honored with ICAA Acanthus Awards // News // School of Architecture // University of Notre Dame

The Acanthus Awards … honor exemplary student work in classical or traditional design from current students and recent graduates.  School of Architecture alumnus Christopher C. Miller, M. Arch ‘14, received recognition for his thesis project, Market Bridge for Bath:  Fitting Type to Local Character—Professor Richard Economakis was the thesis advisor.  Miller developed a plan for a mixed use neighborhood development in the area surrounding River Avon in the historic city of Bath in England. Source: Faculty and Alumnus Honored with ICAA Acanthus Awards // News // School of Architecture // University of Notre Dame See A Market for Bath:  Fitting Type to…

The Case for Old Ideas – NYTimes.com

New ideas, rooted in scientific understanding, did help bring societies through the turbulence of industrialization. But the reformers who made the biggest differences — the ones who worked in the slums and with the displaced, attacked cruelties and pushed for social reforms, rebuilt community after it melted into air — often blended innovations with very old moral and religious commitments. When technological progress helped entrench slavery, the religious radicalism of abolitionists helped destroy it. When industrial development rent the fabric of everyday life, religious awakenings helped reknit it. When history’s arc bent toward eugenics, religious humanists helped keep the idea…

Ian Bentley on Responsive Environments (1985)

In my opinion, everywhere is inevitably significant and meaningful, because human beings are so constituted as to read meanings into everything they encounter – this is surely a fundamental aspect of the human condition. The important question is how to make places that have a positive “place potential” I think the answer to this question shifts with historical circumstances. For example, back in the 1980s – when RE was written – choice seemed “the supreme quality”, as the sociologist Zygmunt Bauman put it. The key qualities around which RE is organised, therefore, are all meant to structure space (of course,…

Architecture, urbanism, design and behaviour: a brief review | Architectures | Dan Lockton

In designing and constructing environments in which people live and work, architects and planners are necessarily involved in influencing human behaviour. While Sommer 1969, p.3 asserted that the architect “in his training and practice, learns to look at buildings without people in them,” it is clear that from, for example, Howard’s Garden Cities of To-morrow 1902, through Le Corbusier’s Ville Contemporaine and La Ville radieuse, to the Smithsons’ ‘Streets in the sky’, there has been a long-standing thread of recognition that the way people live their lives is directly linked to the designed environments in which they live. Whether the…

Going Mental: Everyday Travel and the Cognitive Map

by Andrew Mondschein, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Brian D. Taylor How do you get to work? Do you have a preferred route to your favorite restaurant? To the nearest hospital? To Disneyland? If you know—or think you know—the answers to any of these questions, then your cognitive map is at work. Humans rely on mental maps to store knowledge of places and routes in order to engage in travel and activities. People use their cognitive maps to decide where to go and how to get there. But accessibility research has largely ignored this essential aspect of travel behavior, despite the fact that…

How We Hate on Architecture Now – Anthony Flint – The Atlantic Cities

[excerpt] … architecture is so routinely pilloried, and with such imaginative comparisons, delicious takedowns, and clever labels. The nicknames come from comedians and critics, rivals and urban legend. London is clearly current headquarters for this business, beginning with Norman Foster’s Swiss Re tower, all but officially renamed the Gherkin, as in the pickle (just think – if somebody came up with it first, it could have been the pine cone). Then there’s the Cheese Grater and the Walkie-Talkie (the Leadenhall Building and 20 Fenchurch Street, respectively), handily skewered side by side in this review in The Guardian. …. In the…

The Value of Urban Design

“The Value of Urban Design represents a ground-breaking attempt to pin down the economic, social and environmental value of good urban design. Undertaken by the Bartlett School of Planning for CABE and DETR, the study uses an analysis of selected commercial developments in the UK to look at how good urban design provides a range of benefits including higher rental levels, lower maintenance costs, enhanced regeneration and increased public support for development. The study makes essential reading for developers, investors, occupiers, planners and design professionals and marks an important step towards ensuring that urban design receives adequate investment from the…

Homes for a Changing Region – In Detail — Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning

Homes for a Changing Region CMAP is currently working with Kane County to provide Homes for a Changing Region plans to two clusters of eight municipalities along the Fox River.  The first cluster includes Carpentersville, East Dundee, Elgin, and West Dundee.  Work in Batavia, Geneva, North Aurora, and St Charles will begin this summer and is made possible through Kane County staff participation as part of the Kane County Planning Cooperative. Homes for a Changing Region enables municipal leaders to chart future demand and supply trends for housing in their communities and develop long-term housing policy plans. These plans aim…

SAHARA Travel Fellow Report: Vernacular Settlements in China

My trip to China in the summer of 2012 was to visit vernacular settlements that were located along important trade routes and influenced by business activities.  The goal of my trip was to gather preliminary data and select possible sites for my dissertation. I mainly focused on vernacular settlements along two major trade routes, the Xianxia Historic Route and the Tea Horse Road. The Xianxia Historic Route was one of the two busiest commercial routes in pre-modern China since the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644), while the other one was the Grand Canal.  The Xianxia Historic Route was part of an extended…

The Neurobiology behind a Sense of Place | Brain Blogger

I remember clearly one of the first times I was aware of the concept that can be characterized as a “sense of place.” Several months into a year-long backpacking trip, I was mesmerized by my experiences in East Africa. Then, once it became what would have been summer back home, I experienced a sudden and profound sense of longing for the landscapes of Ontario. I was not homesick so much as missing the whole milieu I would normally experience in that sweet season: the forests, lakes, rock, and activities of summer time. This attachment to somewhere, be it a natural…