How one woman harnessed people power to ‘save’ old New York | Film | The Guardian

Citizen Jane: Battle for the City tells the story of Jacobs, author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities, who made herself the bane of New York’s powerful city planners from the 1950s to 1970s. Her nemesis was Robert Moses, the city’s powerful master builder and advocate of urban renewal, or wholesale neighbourhood clearance – what author James Baldwin termed “negro removal”.Moses dismissed the protesters as “a bunch of mothers”, and attempted to ignore their efforts to attract wider attention, which included taping white crosses across their glasses in the style of Jacobs.But through a combination of grassroots…

Cities need Goldilocks housing density – not too high or low, but just right | Life and style | The Guardian

I am an architect and I certainly consider myself an environmentalist, but it appears to me that in a lot of cities, these new glass towers don’t add much at all to the city in terms of energy efficiency or quality of life. Often they don’t add many more housing units than the buildings they replace. I am also a heritage activist, not because I particularly love old buildings, but because there is so much to learn from them and from the neighbourhoods. and cities that were designed before cars or electricity or thermostats, and were built at surprisingly high…

As hundreds of toxic sites await cleanup, questions over Superfund program’s future | PBS NewsHour

In Brooklyn, Gowanus Canal Conservancy’s Executive Director Andrea Parker said the promise of a cleaner canal has already fueled considerable development in the surrounding neighborhood, even as the amount of affordable housing in the area decreases and some residents worry about displacement. But other locals remain optimistic that the project will be completed despite the threat of cuts to the Superfund program. Source: As hundreds of toxic sites await cleanup, questions over Superfund program’s future | PBS NewsHour

Shaking Up the 21st-Century Multifamily Market with a Missing Middle Neighborhood | Opticos Design, Inc.Opticos Design, Inc.

A New Model for Multifamily/Rental Housing: A Missing Middle Neighborhood The neighborhood will be significant in several ways. Nationally, there has not been a new, walkable, New Urbanist neighborhood of its kind developed with only Missing Middle Housing types; it will serve as a much-needed model for the Omaha and Lincoln regions, whose previous attempts at New Urbanism have fallen short on implementation quality; and this project will also define a new type and quality of multifamily housing (to use a loaded term) in the country. The site is 60 acres with a rolling topography that leads down to a…

Create Streets

Create Streets is a non-partisan social enterprise and independent research institute focusing on the built environment. We encourage the creation of more and better urban homes with terraced streets of houses and apartments rather than complex multi-storey buildings. We support reform of the planning system to make it more effectively responsive to what people like in the built environment and campaign for community-led building and locally-supported estate regeneration to deliver homes that are popular and stand the test of time. Source: what we do – Create Streets

People prefer neo-traditional buildings — Adam Smith Institute

It seems obvious to me—and I think to most people—that housing built since the 1930s is by and large much less attractive than housing built before. But if this is true, and if we are much richer now than we were in the 1930s and before, then why would we build, buy and live in housing we don’t like? We have some sort of market in housing; surely if we really all preferred traditional housing styles we’d just buy it. A new paper (slides) provides the answer—at least if we can assume the UK and the Netherlands are similar in this respect….

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD, DISTRICT, AND CORRIDOR – ACADEMIC AWARD

RESPONSE TO CHARTER PRINCIPLES      The building stock is retained for present uses or for adaptive re-uses (Charter Principles 4, 5, 27).  New buildings are shaped with shallow floor plates for passive heating, cooling, and ventilating; these are also modeled to accommodate flexibly a variety of uses and do so over time: groceries, doctors offices, retail (CP 12, 26).  The blocks are small with a fine-grain to maximize the choices for pedestrians (CP 12).      Second, the proposed intervention reverses the urban morphology with the canal as the backside to the canal as the neighborhood’s public space as…

Congress for the New Urbanism Illinois Academic Charter Award 2016 for Gowanus: from Resilience to Sustainability

    Judson’s graduate urbanism studio has received the 2016 academic CNU-IL Charter Award!  This makes three years in a row!  Graduate student team: Justin Banda, Kay Havlicek, Tyler Hopwood, Marvin Reyes, Tyler Wade, and Andrew Witek.

DC’s first tiny house movement was in the 1880s | History Sidebar

Orange’s tiny houses proposal could mean Washington may be coming full circle to embrace the benefits of housing and economic diversity. Though the Washington City Paper compared the potential outcome of Orange’s proposal to the creation of new fangled Hoovervilles—“Orangevilles,” a columnist called them—a more apt comparison would be to housing that was widespread in Washington nearly a century before the Great Depression. Source: DC’s first tiny house movement was in the 1880s | History Sidebar