Richard Sennett: The world wants more ‘porous’ cities – so why don’t we build them? | Cities | The Guardian

Is it worth trying to turn the dream of the porous city into a pervasive reality? I wondered in Nehru Place about the social side of this question, since Indian cities have been swept from time to time by waves of ethnic and religious violence. Could porous places tamp down that threat, by mixing people together in everyday activities? Evidence from western cities answers both yes and no. In Dresden, last year’s Pegida demonstrations against the Muslim presence in Germany turned out to be by people who don’t live anywhere near Muslims in the city; indeed, who know no Muslims. There again,…

Beyond the maximum: cities may be booming, but who’s invited to the party? | Cities | The Guardian

I’ve been spending a lot of time in New York’s Coney Island, because it’s the capital of fun, the people’s playground. If you sit on the Boardwalk in Coney Island and watch the everyday carnival of all the races of the earth strolling together without knowing much about each other – the hipsters in leather, the Bangladeshis in hijab, the Russians in bikinis – then you realise the great secret about why Coney Island works. It’s not that everyone is included. It’s that no-one is excluded. It’s not that you’ll get invited to every party on the beach. It’s that…

Live Blog: Richard Sennett, “The Architecture of Cooperation” | Blogs | Archinect

“The theme of the lecture addresses a question: how can we design spaces in the city which encourage strangers to cooperate?  To explore this question, I’ll draw on research in the social sciences about cooperation, based on my book, and relate this research to current issues in urban design.”—Richard Sennett via Live Blog: Richard Sennett, “The Architecture of Cooperation” | Blogs | Archinect.