Faculty and Alumnus Honored with ICAA Acanthus Awards // News // School of Architecture // University of Notre Dame

The Acanthus Awards … honor exemplary student work in classical or traditional design from current students and recent graduates.  School of Architecture alumnus Christopher C. Miller, M. Arch ‘14, received recognition for his thesis project, Market Bridge for Bath:  Fitting Type to Local Character—Professor Richard Economakis was the thesis advisor.  Miller developed a plan for a mixed use neighborhood development in the area surrounding River Avon in the historic city of Bath in England. Source: Faculty and Alumnus Honored with ICAA Acanthus Awards // News // School of Architecture // University of Notre Dame See A Market for Bath:  Fitting Type to…

If a City Were Perfect, What Would It Look Like? – The New York Times

When Baldassare Castiglione described Urbino in 1506 as a “city in the form of a palace” he would probably have expected his more cultivated readers to catch the allusion to Leon Battista Alberti’s assertion in his “De re aedificatoria” (On the Art of Building) that “the city is like a great house, and the house in its turn a small city.” During his reign between 1444 and 1482, Federico da Montefeltro’s marvelous edifice played host to as much intellectual and artistic activity as entire cities many times Urbino’s size. And Alberti, along with Luciano Laurana, Piero della Francesca and Francesco…

Atlanta Studies | Atlanta’s War on Density

The City of Atlanta now has an exceedingly rare opportunity to correct some of its most atrocious attacks on the urban built environment. As the city works with private developers to once again redevelop the areas of Turner Field and the Atlanta Civic Center by pursuing urban residential development designed primarily for pedestrians, cyclists, and smaller commercial activity, these two redevelopment projects can serve as the beginning of Atlanta’s abandonment of anti-urban and suburban influenced development and as a return to the defining features of cities: walkable, mixed-use, people-centered development.Atlanta may have wiped away most of the small-scale commercial and…

The Stones of Washington by Michael Knox Beran, City Journal December 26, 2015

Like so many other new-made towns, Washington lacks whatever it is that gives Old Western (I have followed C. S. Lewis in capitalizing the words “Old Western” as he did in his lecture “De Descriptione Temporum”) cities like Arles and Kraków, Munich and Venice, their charm and interest. It would be extravagant to criticize Lewis for his failure to ask why Washington lacks this deeper civic artistry: yet it is difficult not to conclude that the problem of Washington—essentially the problem of the American city—is bigger than Lewis allows.A truly revealing history of any American town, big or small, would…

Congress for the New Urbanism Illinois Academic Charter Award 2015 for Selverhull, Winchester UK

  The regeneration of Winchester’s northeast quadrant has been a public concern for more than thirty years.  At WinchesterDeservesBetter, Wintonians are campaigning for the serviceability and identity of this venerable and beautiful city.  We have investigated two development alternatives to meet the public interest. The regeneration knits to the high-performing residential fabric to the immediate north and the High Street, develops an opportunity along a channeled brook for connection to regional water meadows, balances pedestrian access against vehicular demands, and resources precedent types promoting local identity and demographic diversity.

IASTE / LEGITIMATING TRADITION December 17-20, 2016 | Kuwait City

In contemporary contexts of globalization, political conflict, and dynamic social and cultural change, legitimacy is often invoked, questioned, or challenged by various actors to achieve certain ends. This conference seeks to ask: What role does tradition play in legitimating practices that produce place-based or placeless built environments?Recent IASTE conferences have explored the role of subjectivity, authorship, and power in the construction of traditions in space and place. These themes often implied processes of legitimation that affect the built environment in ways that are sometimes more hidden and sometimes more obvious. This conference will seek to address this issue and to…

Le Corbusier was ‘militant fascist’, two new books on French architect claim – Telegraph

France’s best-known 20th century architect, Le Corbusier, was a “militant fascist” who was far more anti-Semitic and a fan of Hitler than previously thought, two new books reveal. The unsettling disclosures about the links of one of the world’s most famous modern architects to France’s wartime collaborationist Vichy regime have been released just ahead of a major Paris exhibition of his work. It has long been known that Le Corbusier, famed for his revolutionary concrete creations, including a housing project in Marseille called La Cité Radieuse, had some ties to France’s collaborationist regime under Field Marshal Philippe Pétain. But the…

Donovan Rypkema on “Sustainability, Smart Growth and Historic Preservation” | Blue Planet Green Living

Sustainable development is about, but not limited to, environmental sustainability. There is far more to sustainable development than green buildings, such as: Repairing and rebuilding historic wood windows would mean that the dollars are spent locally instead of at a distant window manufacturing plant. That’s economic sustainability, also part of sustainable development. Maintaining as much of the original fabric as possible is maintaining the character of the historic neighborhood. That’s cultural sustainability, also part of sustainable development. But if we don’t yet get it in the United States, others do. There’s an international real estate consulting firm based in Great…

The forgotten history of how automakers invented the crime of “jaywalking” – Vox

“In the early days of the automobile, it was drivers’ job to avoid you, not your job to avoid them,” says Peter Norton, a historian at the University of Virginia and author of Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City. “But under the new model, streets became a place for cars — and as a pedestrian, it’s your fault if you get hit.” One of the keys to this shift was the creation of the crime of jaywalking. Here’s a history of how that happened. via The forgotten history of how automakers invented the crime…