As hundreds of toxic sites await cleanup, questions over Superfund program’s future | PBS NewsHour

In Brooklyn, Gowanus Canal Conservancy’s Executive Director Andrea Parker said the promise of a cleaner canal has already fueled considerable development in the surrounding neighborhood, even as the amount of affordable housing in the area decreases and some residents worry about displacement. But other locals remain optimistic that the project will be completed despite the threat of cuts to the Superfund program. Source: As hundreds of toxic sites await cleanup, questions over Superfund program’s future | PBS NewsHour Advertisements

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD, DISTRICT, AND CORRIDOR – ACADEMIC AWARD

RESPONSE TO CHARTER PRINCIPLES      The building stock is retained for present uses or for adaptive re-uses (Charter Principles 4, 5, 27).  New buildings are shaped with shallow floor plates for passive heating, cooling, and ventilating; these are also modeled to accommodate flexibly a variety of uses and do so over time: groceries, doctors offices, retail (CP 12, 26).  The blocks are small with a fine-grain to maximize the choices for pedestrians (CP 12).      Second, the proposed intervention reverses the urban morphology with the canal as the backside to the canal as the neighborhood’s public space as…

Congress for the New Urbanism Illinois Academic Charter Award 2016 for Gowanus: from Resilience to Sustainability

    Judson’s graduate urbanism studio has received the 2016 academic CNU-IL Charter Award!  This makes three years in a row!  Graduate student team: Justin Banda, Kay Havlicek, Tyler Hopwood, Marvin Reyes, Tyler Wade, and Andrew Witek.

A Waterfront Route to Serve the Poor, Not Just the Wealthy – The New York Times

Mr. de Blasio said on Thursday that he planned to build a new streetcar line along the waterfront from Brooklyn to Queens, a stretch of real estate that now commands stupefying prices but offers almost no public transit options. “Not everybody rides bicycles,” observed Richard Ravitch, the former lieutenant governor. Of course, streetcars would aid and abet the rampage of gentrification. But they would also provide a chance at decent transit for more than 40,000 people who live in New York City housing projects that were built along the waterfront in the 1940s and ’50s, when the area was an…

Mapping the Effects of Parking Minimums — Strong Towns

What makes surface parking so destructive is that it consumes a finite resource with virtually no direct financial benefit. Our pre-occupation at Urban Three is local finance. From that perspective, parking–in particular the vast kind that adorns strip malls and box stores–is dead weight. Local governments, be they in cities, towns, or counties, are all constrained by the land they can develop. What they do with that resource is thus, paramount to how well they can pay their bills. Tax revenue is but one of many resources squandered by each acre of land devoted to deactivated cars. What’s fascinating about this model…

Congress for the New Urbanism Illinois Academic Charter Award 2015 for Selverhull, Winchester UK

  The regeneration of Winchester’s northeast quadrant has been a public concern for more than thirty years.  At WinchesterDeservesBetter, Wintonians are campaigning for the serviceability and identity of this venerable and beautiful city.  We have investigated two development alternatives to meet the public interest. The regeneration knits to the high-performing residential fabric to the immediate north and the High Street, develops an opportunity along a channeled brook for connection to regional water meadows, balances pedestrian access against vehicular demands, and resources precedent types promoting local identity and demographic diversity.

How cars seized city streets from pedestrians – Vox

Roads were not always the domain of cars. In the early 1900s, “pedestrians were walking in the streets anywhere they wanted, whenever they wanted, usually without looking,” Peter Norton, a historian at the University of Virginia, told me for a recent article about the creation of the crime of jaywalking. Obviously, that didn’t last long. As cars began to spread, accidents increased, and automakers embarked on an aggressive campaign to redefine who belonged on the roads, eventually restricting pedestrians to crosswalks. It worked so successfully that, today, few people are aware that city streets were once a bustling mix of pedestrians,…

The forgotten history of how automakers invented the crime of “jaywalking” – Vox

“In the early days of the automobile, it was drivers’ job to avoid you, not your job to avoid them,” says Peter Norton, a historian at the University of Virginia and author of Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City. “But under the new model, streets became a place for cars — and as a pedestrian, it’s your fault if you get hit.” One of the keys to this shift was the creation of the crime of jaywalking. Here’s a history of how that happened. via The forgotten history of how automakers invented the crime…

60 Years of Urban Change: Midwest | The Institute for Quality Communities

60 years has made a big difference in the urban form of American cities. The most rapid change occurred during the mid-century urban renewal period that cleared large tracts of urban land for new highways, parking, and public facilities or housing projects. Fine-grained networks of streets and buildings on small lots were replaced with superblocks and megastructures. While the period did make way for impressive new projects in many cities, many of the scars are still unhealed. We put together these sliders to show how cities have changed over half a century. In this post, we look at Midwestern cities…